ERP implementation risk

9 Drowning ERP Implementation Risk Factors You Need to be Mindful of

For many decades companies have adopted the strategy of using Commercial-off-the-Shelf Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems to meet their requirements. Almost all of them do come with some known ERP implementation risk.

The availability of extensive pre-existing functionality in these are supposed to reduce risk and improve performance of business (as they claim!). However, a study estimates that only 10% of ERP implementations succeed with full functionality.

The key issue is that, given pre-existing functionality, organisations need to make significant strategic and tactical decisions about whether to change the business to fit the system or whether to change the system to fit the business. This blogs outlines ERP implementation risk factors and the current level of software process support for ERPs. It analyses these issues from a theoretical and practical perspective, by relating the experience of current ERP implementation to what is found in research.

Based on own experience and a number of academic sources such as Barki et al. (1993), Keil et al. (1998), Block (1993), Ewusi-Mensah (1997) and others the authors identified these 9 ERP implementation risks:

 

ERP Implementation Risk:

 

1.     Failure to Redesign Business Processes to Fit the Software:

 

There is strong desire to fit the new ERP system to fit to current process. But this is hardly the case. In fact the right thing is to redesign your current processes to fit to purchase ERP system.

The reality is neither option is easy. It is very difficult in most business to change old or existing processes and to customize the ERP system to fit to current processes is costly and time-consuming venture. In my view this is biggest ERP implementation risk

2.     Lack of Senior Management Support

 

Support of top management 
is crucial for accomplishing projects objectives. It is easy for senior managers to become a sponsor but very difficult to let go the crucial team member for pilot testing or super user training.

The unfortunate fact is the people who need to be trained as “Super Users”, are the same “key” people who run the business. The lack of senior people support to give time away from the desk, as they are too afraid to miss sales, delivery to customer is one of the most common ERP implementation risk.

3.     Insufficient Training and Reskilling of End-Users

 

A number of firms learned that 
investment in training and reskilling the employees were higher than expected. Most ERP implementation comes with deadlines that need to met. As a result, there is hardly enough time to train most people and give them skills they need to reach the satisfactory performance state.

4.     Lack of Ability to Recruit and Retain Qualified Systems Developers

 

Many of the organizations found it difficult to recruit and retain good ERP specialists because the market rates for these people are high. The developers of biggest market share ERP vendors like SAP, Oracle, Microsoft Dynamics and Infor are in high demand and moves from one consultancy project to another. So not finding a in-house ERP specialist could be significant ERP implementation risk.

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5.     Inability to Obtain Full-Time Commitment of Employee to project Management and Project Activities

 

Similar to point 2, it might be difficult to get managers and employees to commit to project management roles because they may be uncertain about what responsibilities will still be open to them once they are transferred back to their positions.

Or, in some cases, there’s no back up for their day job while busy in implementation and testing causing backlog of work, up-set customers and compounding stress as a result.

6.     Lack of Integration

 

Once ERP is implemented or about to be implemented, it is very important that key business processes covers areas related to feasibility, requirements, prototyping and implementation ERP functionalities. These areas are the source of many issues in ERP implementation.

Further, ERP implementations increasingly include technical work through enhanced configuration features and the need for extensive integration with other systems (for example financial, supply chain or quality software & tools).

Another example would be old metrics which was life blood to measure the business is no more available as they used, hence, process and systems functionalities must fit each other for proper integration.

7.     Lack of Change Management

 

It is very easy to take for granted that all employees will accept that implementing ERP system is ‘Good Thing’! It might not be the case when you talk to the employer who is using the same old system for the last 10 years and feels the things he/she is doing a fine job for business and customers with the old system.

 

These people firmly believe “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it”

 

The people who know most in business and are very good at their job sometimes can be the biggest road block of new system deployment and can come up with all possible reasons why it will not work as they know the business inside out! Hence, imposing significant ERP implement risk.

Therefore, it is important to launch a change in management program to make them understand why business and them have to go through the pain and why the grass is greener on the other side.

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8.     Poor Technology Planning

 

Lack of adequate technical expertise and adequate technology infrastructure for supporting project requirements, this ERP implementation risk factors include: technological newness (need for new hardware and software), application size (project scope, number of users and team diversity), application complexity and failure of technology to meet specifications.

9.     Less than Awesome Project management

 

Lets accept it, implementing ERP is a massive project and last anything between 18 and 24 months or more. Less than awesome project management in any business is significant ERP implementation risk.

The extent of risk of project cost and time overrun due to lack of a measurement system for assessing and controlling project risk depends on project size, experience with the new technology and project structure.

In Summary

 

Any business is planning to implement ERP or upgrade the new one should be mindful of:

  • All the risks associated with the recruitment and retention of IT/ERP Subject Matter Expert professionals;
  • Insufficient training and reskilling;
  • Insufficient internal expertise;
  • Failure to mix internal and external expertise effectively;
  • Failure to keep to the standard specifications which the software supports;
  • Attempts to build bridges to legacy applications.
  • The risk of failure to redesign business processes and of following an enterprise-wide design that supports data integration across the organization;

 

This article represents both theoretical and practical approaches towards the “ERP implementation risk factors” by summarizing the academic sources and conducting the field research.

This kind of an extensive double side approach makes the article of interest to those managers who would like to know more about ERP implementation.

If you have observed any more ERP implementation risk in your industry then please do leave the comments in the comments box! I look forward to learn from you.

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Recommended Reading

Control Your ERP Destiny: Reduce Project Costs, Mitigate Risks, and Design Better Business Solutions

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Modern ERP: Select, Implement, and Use Today’s Advanced Business Systems





4 thoughts on “9 Drowning ERP Implementation Risk Factors You Need to be Mindful of

  1. QUOTE: There is strong desire to fit the new ERP system to fit to current process. But this is hardly the case. In fact the right thing is to redesign your current processes to fit to purchase ERP system. These two lines got me going:
    In fact both statements I feel are incorrect…………..the second is ludicrous.
    Kindly expand and explain your comments…too which I will reply.
    It is a known FACT that not one Warehouse/DC operates the same as any other…there are too many “influencing factors eg. customer requirements etc…….so let ALL DC/Warehouses globally !! stop operating its own way and re-do to fit he ERP Sytem ???…TOTAL CHAOS

    1. @Loray Daws:

      I don’t think bending ERP system too much as per your own processes will do any favor, it would be better to not implement ERP then.

    2. Sorry if I am late to this, but its not that you can’t have the system designed around your distinct business practices; its in that if you do you will run into other issues down the road that may cause you more grief. I have worked for a few organizations in this debacle.
      Any mods you add to a system are not going to be updated with the normal software updates. You may end up not being able to update without first reversing those mods, and having them redesigned for the new version. Depending on how many you have could cripple your plans.
      The other thing you may run into is the system won’t do what it was supposed to. Depending on the mods, they may cause interference with other parts of your ERP and it may not have the full functionality that was initially designed into it, and what you were sold on.
      At the end of the day, buy a system which most closely matches your needs in every way. If you need to make a couple mods, okay. Be aware that you may have to have them re-engineered at some point to move forward further.

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